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A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films

A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films Best Read || [Sinclair McKay] - A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films, A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror The History Of Hammer Films MINT CONDITION

  • Title: A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films
  • Author: Sinclair McKay
  • ISBN: 9781845132491
  • Page: 148
  • Format: Paperback

A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films Best Read || [Sinclair McKay], A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films, Sinclair McKay, A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror The History Of Hammer Films MINT CONDITION A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films Best Read || [Sinclair McKay] - A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films, A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror The History Of Hammer Films MINT CONDITION

  • A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films Best Read || [Sinclair McKay]
    148Sinclair McKay
A Thing Of Unspeakable Horror: The History Of Hammer Films

About "Sinclair McKay"

  1. Sinclair McKay

    Sinclair McKay writes regularly for the Daily Telegraph and The Secret Listeners and has written books about James Bond and Hammer horror for Aurum His next book, about the wartime Y Service during World War II, is due to be published by Aurum in 2012 He lives in London Source

678 Comments

  1. Breezy and readable, this is a history of Hammer, the quintessential British horror film studio of the 50s and 60s written by someone who is obviously a fan As such, some of his preferences and assessments are open to debate by fellow fans, but it also means that the book is written with a fondness for Hammer horror, initially the most extreme, gory thing staid British critics and censors in the 50s had ever seen, but increasingly a never never land unto themselves McKay is somewhat repetitive a [...]


  2. Hammer Films may have been founded in 1935 but it only produced anything of consequence, other than the first of its Quatermass series in 1955, when Peter Cushing emerged as Baron Frankenstein in The Curse of Frankenstein 1957 Until its final demise as film maker in 1979 although its story really ends in 1974 to all intents and purposes , it became known for a peculiarly English Gothic take on themes originally developed by Universal Studios in the 1930s but derived from English literary models. [...]



  3. The author clearly has an affection for the studio, though he can t help but laugh a bit at their efforts It s a solid and interesting history of the studio and its decline written before the studio s resurrection The author has a tendency to get ahead of himself in the narrative and I was surprised at the absence of Captain Kronos Vampire Hunter, my favorite and one of the best late era Hammer flicks.


  4. This was a wee bit all over the place in terms of a chronological appraisal of the hammer films I was disappointed one of my favourite films, the swashbuckling western horror mash up Kaptain Kronos Vampire Hunter , only got a few sentences.Still, I enjoyed it and there s no doubting Sinclair s love and enthusiasm for the films.


  5. Being a Hammer Fan I feel this gave a brillant insite into how the Hammer company worked and how Hammer keeped its stamp on the films it made.


  6. A fascinating look at the history, influence and impact of Hammer Films A must read for anyone interested in film history in general, and British film in particular.




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